Saturday, February 8, 2020

Brief the dred scott v. sanford case and the raines v.byrd case Essay

Brief the dred scott v. sanford case and the raines v.byrd case - Essay Example They believed, according to the Court, that African Americans were "beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect." There were two dissenting opinions in this case. One by Justice Mclean and one by Justice Curtis. They argued that the court should not give an opinion on an issue that they had said was beyond their jurisdiction and that the constitution didn’t say what the other judges thought it said. In 1994, the Republicans won control of Congress. They wanted to legislate a Line Item Veto for the President, so the President could veto aspects of a bill (in the past the constitution seemed to imply a president could only veto bills as a whole). A number of congressman disagreed with this idea and sued. The court reasoned that under the constitution a federal court could decide cases only when the plaintiffs had a concrete injury and a personal stake in the issue. The court said the congressmen only had an institutional interest in the matter of the line-item veto—there was no personal

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Rampant Violent Crime Essay Example for Free

Rampant Violent Crime Essay Since my opponent didnt give any arguments, Ill first my arguments: 1.Violence was always there. Its not a new invention. Since the beginning of time, there has been violence. The first murder is mentioned in the bible. Much before there was even electricity. 2.If the violence you see on television causes you to act violently, each and every one of us (since most of us watch TV) would have been violent 3.Those who act violently are people which are naturally violent. The proof of that is that animals act violently too. animals do not watch TV. They act violently since they are naturally violent creatures. see more:solutions to crime People dont like to look to themselves when we think about our faults so we turn to a inanimate Scapegoat. While Television has violent programs, it is our decision whether or not to act on what we see or what we allow our children to watch. To blame tv is irresponsible, not taking responsibility to yourself. Virtually everyone in our society watches television, yet we dont have rampant violent crime rates. Violence existed long before the television and violent crime rates have actually dropped over time. That alone should invalidate any claim of a direct causal relationship. Unless you want to suggest that violence would be virtually non-existent if we had no entertainment, in which case youre being intentionally obtuse. What television show people have been watching for the last thousands of years? People have been killing people and committing crimes since the beginning of time. I ask an opponent to find one source linking TV to violence directly. Societies with TYs and societies without TVs have crime. Television was the scapegoat formed by the old thesis before the antithesis could roll it over. There is no distinction between right and wrong anymore. I see kids crying in the grocery store all the time, and their parents give them candy. For crying! They associate bad behavior with getting what they want. People who are used to getting what they want will become more aggressive. Teaching right from wrong early on will help with the situation, but it first lies with the parenting. After that, the school system needs to pick up on it. Television is entertainment. And its not the same with video games where people can argue that video games might make dumb kids think its ok to kill people. Most TV shows that have violence show what a bad thing it is, like the guilt and pain that can come from crime. Television has less connection to violence than paintball does to writers block. It is the things the people watch on television that influences them. If they watch an action movie and it doesnt have much friction (the bad guy being caught) the viewers might think I could do this! and get an idea of violent actions. In conclusion,it all depends on the show or movie somebody watches and that type of person. Television cannot cause any actions. Yes, we are influenced by our media. But Ive watched plenty of action-packed gory movies about fights and violence and never had the urge. Part of it is parents, part of it is schooling and local environment. Violence has existed long before the media and although the scope of it has changed, the causes could never be attributed to media. I cant agree with my opponent that Television is the leading cause of violence in todays society. Since my opponent didnt give any arguments, Ill first my arguments: 1. Violence was always there. Its not a new invention. Since the beginning of time, there has been violence. The first murder is mentioned in the bible. Much before there was even electricity. 2. If the violence you see on television causes you to act violently, each and every one of us (since most of us watch TV) would have been violent 3. Those who act violently are people which are naturally violent. The proof of that is that animals act violently too. animals do not watch TV. They act violently since they are naturally violent creatures.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

jesus, the business man :: essays research papers

Purpose/Vision: To restore salvation to a lost world. Background Information: "In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth" (Genesis 1:1). The earth was His vision, His company. He invented everything in the earth and the placed a man and a woman in charge of the business. Their duties, at the time, included naming the animals and multiplying the population with their seed. Although God had a plan for the way he wanted His company run, the people He put in charge had their own agendas. They rebelled against the owner and tried to take over the business. Due to the insubordinate nature of His employees, He terminated their positions and hired other workers. From then on, under the supervision of different men, the fate of the company went down hill. Money and agricultural profits were at a loss, and the values that the employees once had, decreased with each successor. After seeing His business gradually decline from it's original standpoint, God took up a partnership with His Son, Jesus. He sent Jesus into the world to restore the company back to it's original purpose. Knowing the He needed a qualified staff under Him, Jesus employed twelve men to work with him. Chain of Command: Level 1-Owners: God, Jesus, (Holy Ghost-Silent Partner) Level 2-Supervisors: Peter, Paul, John Level 3-Employees: James, Andrew, Phillip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, Lebbaeus, Simon, Judas Employee Qualifications: 1. Must already be employed * Matthew- tax collector (2:14) * Simon- fisherman (1:16) * Andrew- fisherman (1:16) * James- fisherman (1:19) * John- fisherman (1:19) 2. Must be willing to leave everything and relocate * "And immediately He called them and they left their father, Zebedee in the boat with the hired servants and went after Him" (1:20). Services: Healing Ministries: * Sickness and Fevers: "Simon's wife's mother lay sick with a fever and they told Him about her at once. So He came and took her by the hand and lifted her up and immediately the fever left her" (1:31). * Leprosy: "As soon as He had spoken, immediately the leprosy left him, and he was cleansed" (1:42). * Withered Hands: "He said to the man, "Stretch out your hand." And he stretched it out and his hand was restored whole as the other" (3:5). * Demon Possession: "Then they came to Jesus, and saw the one who had been demon-possessed and had the legion, sitting and clothed and in his right mind" (5:15). * Issues of Blood: "And He said to her, "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace, and be healed of your affliction" (5:34). jesus, the business man :: essays research papers Purpose/Vision: To restore salvation to a lost world. Background Information: "In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth" (Genesis 1:1). The earth was His vision, His company. He invented everything in the earth and the placed a man and a woman in charge of the business. Their duties, at the time, included naming the animals and multiplying the population with their seed. Although God had a plan for the way he wanted His company run, the people He put in charge had their own agendas. They rebelled against the owner and tried to take over the business. Due to the insubordinate nature of His employees, He terminated their positions and hired other workers. From then on, under the supervision of different men, the fate of the company went down hill. Money and agricultural profits were at a loss, and the values that the employees once had, decreased with each successor. After seeing His business gradually decline from it's original standpoint, God took up a partnership with His Son, Jesus. He sent Jesus into the world to restore the company back to it's original purpose. Knowing the He needed a qualified staff under Him, Jesus employed twelve men to work with him. Chain of Command: Level 1-Owners: God, Jesus, (Holy Ghost-Silent Partner) Level 2-Supervisors: Peter, Paul, John Level 3-Employees: James, Andrew, Phillip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, Lebbaeus, Simon, Judas Employee Qualifications: 1. Must already be employed * Matthew- tax collector (2:14) * Simon- fisherman (1:16) * Andrew- fisherman (1:16) * James- fisherman (1:19) * John- fisherman (1:19) 2. Must be willing to leave everything and relocate * "And immediately He called them and they left their father, Zebedee in the boat with the hired servants and went after Him" (1:20). Services: Healing Ministries: * Sickness and Fevers: "Simon's wife's mother lay sick with a fever and they told Him about her at once. So He came and took her by the hand and lifted her up and immediately the fever left her" (1:31). * Leprosy: "As soon as He had spoken, immediately the leprosy left him, and he was cleansed" (1:42). * Withered Hands: "He said to the man, "Stretch out your hand." And he stretched it out and his hand was restored whole as the other" (3:5). * Demon Possession: "Then they came to Jesus, and saw the one who had been demon-possessed and had the legion, sitting and clothed and in his right mind" (5:15). * Issues of Blood: "And He said to her, "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace, and be healed of your affliction" (5:34).

Monday, January 13, 2020

Crime Scene Investigations by First Responders Essay

Crime scenes contain the forensic evidence required to apprehend criminals. The proper collection and processing of physical evidence is of primary importance to most police investigations. Evidence can not only establish the fact of the offense and identify the perpetrator; it may even lead to a conviction. In collecting this evidence we must be conscious of the public’s Fourth Amendment rights and not violate them in this collection of evidence. Unfortunately, poorly conducted crime scene investigations can sometimes either destroy evidence or render it useless. Law Enforcement should approach the crime scene investigation as if it will be their only opportunity to preserve and recover these physical clues. They should consider other case information or statements from witnesses or suspects carefully in their objective assessment of the scene. Investigations may change course a number of times during such an inquiry and physical clues, initially thought irrelevant, may becom e crucial to a successful resolution of the case. The primary responsibilities of the first responders to a crime include the following: (1) to preserve life. If there is any chance that the victim(s) are still alive it is the first responders’ reasonability to render aid to save said life. (2) First responders are to control suspects and witnesses keeping them both close but separate. Once these two objectives have been achieved, the first responders should focus their attention on protecting and preserving the crime scene. The first response to an incident shall be expeditious and methodical. Upon arrival, the officer(s) shall assess the scene and treat the incident as a crime scene. The first responders should note or log dispatch information such as names, address, time, type of call, and any other relevant information. Be aware of any persons or vehicles leaving the crime scene. The importance of preserving the scene and its adjacent areas in their original condition cannot be overemphasized. Approach the scene cautiously, scan the entire area to thoroughly assess the scene, and note any possible secondary crime scenes. Be aware of any persons and vehicles in the vicinity that may be related to the crime. Remain alert and attentive; assume the crime is ongoing until determined to be otherwise. Also treat the location as a crime scene until assessed and determined to be otherwise. It is usually the uniformed officer who first arrives at the scene of a crime. After controlling any dangerous situations or persons, the first responding officers’ next responsibility is to ensure that medical attention is provided to injured persons while minimizing contamination of the scene. The first responding officer shall ensure that medical attention is provided with minimal contamination of the scene by guiding medical personnel to the victim to minimize contamination or alteration of the crime scene. Point out potential physical evidence to medical personnel, instruct them to minimize contact with such evidence (e.g., ensure that medical personnel preserve all clothing and personal effects without cutting through bullet holes, knife tears), and document movement of persons or items by medical personnel. Instruct medical personnel not to clean up the scene and to avoid removal or alteration of items originating from the scene. Protecting the evidence typically involves the establishing a perimeter. Only the investigator in charge and those personnel that he gives permission to should be allowed to cross these boundaries this makes it for a more controlled scene. Detectives and supervisors are normally in charge of investigations. There should, however, only be one person in charge of the crime scene itself. The first question that the investigator will ask when they arrives should be something like â€Å"Has anyone been allowed to enter the scene?† The investigator should then use whatever resources are available (e.g., barricades or other uniformed officers) to further protect the area. Such measures exclude both curious bystanders and curious officials. Investigators often must turn away any number of officials–both in and out of uniform–who could unintentional ly destroy evidence. Once the area has been secured, the investigator then carries out the duties of search commander. Initially, the commander must obtain the following information: â€Å"The time of the arrival of the first officer at the scene, who was present, what was said, and whether or not everything is exactly as it was when the officer arrived† (Dienstein, 1952). Then, the addresses of all persons found on or adjacent to the scene should be collected. Although these people are questioned about their exact location at the time of the crime, they do not usually undergo interrogation on the spot. Rather, such persons are simply removed from the scene and separated: They should not be allowed to talk to each other until each has been carefully questioned and statements have been obtained individuals considered as suspect(s) should be read their Miranda Rights. Any violation of Fourth Amendment rights could jeopardize any evidence obtained during an interrogation or interview for use in the case at a trial. Crime scene investigation is a complex process. It involves a number of different professionals and various areas of expertise. Only by acting as a team, however, will the members of such a diverse group ensure that their efforts result in a reasonable outcome. The alteration of a crime scene can cause investigators to draw erroneous conclusions. By expeditiously carrying out his responsibilities, the first responders may determine the ultimate outcome of an entire investigation. citation Dienstein, William, TECHNIQUES FOR THE CRIME INVESTIGATOR, Springfield, ILL: Charles C. Thomas, 222 pages, 1952 Lyman, Michael D. Criminal Investigation, The Art And The Science. 6. Upper Saddle River , New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc, 2011. Print.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

What Does Adsorption Mean in Chemistry

Adsorption is defined as the adhesion of a chemical species onto the surface of particles. German physicist Heinrich Kayser coined the term adsorption in 1881. Adsorption is a different process from absorption, in which a substance diffuses into a liquid or solid to form a solution. In adsorption, the gas or liquid particles bind to the solid or liquid surface that is termed the adsorbent. The particles form an atomic or molecular adsorbate film. Isotherms are used to describe adsorption because the temperature has a significant effect on the process. The quantity of adsorbate bound to the adsorbent is expressed as a function of the pressure of concentration at a constant temperature. Several isotherm models have been developed to describe adsorption including: The linear theoryFreundlich theoryLangmuir theoryBET theory (after Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller)Kisliuk theory Terms related to adsorption include: Sorption: This encompasses both adsorption and absorption processes.Desorption: The reverse process of sorption. The reverse of adsorption or absorption. IUPAC Definition of Adsorption The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) definition of adsorption is: Adsorption vs. Absorption Adsorption is a surface phenomenon in which particles or molecules bind to the top layer of material. Absorption, on the other hand, goes deeper, involving the entire volume of the absorbent. Absorption is the filling of pores or holes in a substance. Characteristics of Adsorbents Typically, adsorbents have small pore diameters so that there is a high surface area to facilitate adsorption. The pore size usually ranges between 0.25 and 5 mm. Industrial adsorbents have high thermal stability and resistance to abrasion. Depending on the application, the surface may be hydrophobic or hydrophilic. Both polar and nonpolar adsorbents exist. The adsorbents come in many shapes, including rods, pellets, and molded shapes. There are three major classes of industrial adsorbents: Carbon-based compounds (e.g., graphite, activated charcoal)Oxygen-based compounds (e.g., zeolites, silica)Polymer-based compounds How Adsorption Works Adsorption depends on surface energy. Surface atoms of the adsorbent are partially exposed so they can attract the adsorbate molecules. Adsorption may result from electrostatic attraction, chemisorption, or physisorption. Examples of Adsorption Examples of adsorbents include: Silica gelAluminaActivated carbon or charcoalZeolitesAdsorption chillers used with refrigerantsBiomaterials that adsorb proteins Adsorption is the first stage of a virus life cycle. Some scientists consider the video game Tetris a model for the process of adsorption of shaped molecules onto flat surfaces. Uses of Adsorption There are many applications of the adsorption process, including: Adsorption is used to cool water for air conditioning units.Activated charcoal is used for aquarium filtration and home water filtration.Silica gel is used to prevent moisture from damaging electronics and clothing.Adsorbents are used to increase the capacity of carbide-derived carbons.Adsorbents are used to produce non-stick coatings on surfaces.Adsorption may be used to extend the exposure time of specific drugs.Zeolites are used to remove carbon dioxide from natural gas, remove carbon monoxide from reforming gas, for catalytic cracking, and other processes.The process is used in chemistry labs for ion-exchange and chromatography. Sources Glossary of atmospheric chemistry terms (Recommendations 1990). Pure and Applied Chemistry 62: 2167. 1990.Ferrari, L.; Kaufmann, J.; Winnefeld, F.; Plank, J. (2010). Interaction of cement model systems with superplasticizers investigated by atomic force microscopy, zeta potential, and adsorption measurements. J Colloid Interface Sci. 347 (1): 15–24.

Saturday, December 28, 2019

An Argument Against Racial Profiling by Police Essay example

This essay will bring to light the problem of racial profiling in the police force and propose the eradication of any discrimination. The Fourth Amendment states â€Å"the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.† Despite this right, multiple minorities across the country suffer at the hands of police officers through racial profiling; the singling out of a person or persons as the main suspect of a crime based on their race. Many people have also suffered†¦show more content†¦These searches are meant to illustrate the increased police efficiency with the discovery of illegal contrabands, however, recent research has shown repeatedly that increasing the number of stops and searches among minorities doesn’t lead to more drug seizures than are found in routine traffic stops and searches among white drivers. Mino rities are also subject to an increased number of arrests for minor crimes. In Minneapolis, African-Americans are 11 times more likely to be thrown into jail (but not necessarily convicted) for drinking in public, 19 times more likely for trespassing, 27 times more likely for lurking, and 42 times more likely for not having a valid license, than that of while citizens. When faced with a threat human instinct is to kill first instead of to be killed. Police are trained to disable a threat and as a last resort, kill. What does it say about America’s law enforcement when an officers’ victim is a person of colour who is unarmed? A recent and well known case of unjust demise by police is 22-year-old Oscar Grant. A young black man gunned down, whilst handcuffed, by a white police officer. Grant was unarmed and posed no threat to the officer. Similarly, 23-year-old Robert Tolan Jr. was given the same fate by an officer who allegedly received inaccurate information about a stolen vehicle. Like Grant, Tolan happened to be a black man shot by a white police officer while unarmed. NoShow MoreRelatedAn Argument Against Racial Profiling by Police1379 Words   |  6 PagesRacial profiling in the dictionary is â€Å"the assumption of criminality among ethnic groups: the alleged policy of some police to attribute criminal intentions to members of some ethnic groups and to stop and question them in disproportionate numbers without probable cause (â€Å"Racial Profiling†).† In other words racial profiling is making assumptions that certain individuals are more likely to be involved in misconduct or criminal activity based on that individual’s race or ethnicity. Racial profilingRead MoreThe Problem With Racial Profiling1561 Words   |  7 Pages we have a problem in our justice system with racial profiling. Racial profiling is defined as targeting or stopping an individual based on his or her race without suspicion of a crime. On one hand, we have people who are completely against racial profiling. On the other hand, some believe that there is no problem with racial profiling. I am very interested in finding out both sides of this argument. What are the rights and wrongs of racial profiling? I chose Jeffrey Toobin’s (2013) blog post RightsRead MoreArrested Development Essay1054 Words   |  5 Pages Williams ------------------------------------------------- EN102 Outline for argument analysis: Arrested Development I. ------------------------------------------------- Introduction: * ------------------------------------------------- James Forman Jr. targets this article towards conservatives who oppose racial profiling * ------------------------------------------------- Claim: Forman claims that racial profiling is an ineffective way to enforce the law and should be stopped. ------------------------------------------------- Read MoreRacial Profiling And The Right For Police Officers1526 Words   |  7 Pageswhat makes us unique; it helps identify ourselves amongst the billions of people in the world. However, does the previous history of your race or ethnicity grant the right for police officers to profile you? That question is countlessly being debated amongst American citizens and even top government officials. Racial profiling is a subject that has stirred up so much controversy in the past that it still hasn t been fully resolved to this day. To put into historical context, periods of American historyRead MoreShould The Color Of One’S Skin Subject Them To A Higher1684 Words   |  7 Pagescontroversial topic in today’s society and leaves many confused. There are many arguments from all sides, some saying that this practice has helped catch many criminals and that people would not have to worry if they are not doing anything wrong. Oth ers deny it all together and say that racial profiling simply does not exist and police officers are just trying to do their job. These arguments are both wrong. Not only does racial profiling exist, but it is wrong and only serves to create fear where there shouldRead MorePersuasive Essay On Racial Profiling1486 Words   |  6 Pages Racial Profiling is an act of automatically defining or identifying someone based on their ethnicity. This act was most recognized during the late 1800’s in the U.S. under the Jim Crow law. It was passed in order to segregate whites and the colored in America. It fundamentally made whites superior to all. Though, in 1964 the Civil Rights Act passed stating that anybody of any ethnicity or religion are to be equal and united. However, today this law has never been truly accepted when seeing the statisticsRead MoreThe Color Of Justice : Race, Ethnicity, And Crime939 Words   |  4 Pagesand victimized by excessive physical force; has been a real issue even in today’s society. However, police departments are trying to combat the way police officers interact with the community; especially those of color. Although steps have been takes there are still some instances where police aggression happens. With all of the issues that arise between certain minority populated community’s police it is evident that conflict theory reins true. An example is the number of arrests, unjustified shootingsRead MoreRacial Profiling Term Paper1588 Words   |  7 PagesRacial profiling is a popular method used by law officers in order to hypothetically enhance crime prevention by targeting minorities, because they are more likely to commit a crime. According to Wikipedia, racial profiling is defined as: the inclusion of race in the profile of a person considered likely to commit a particular crime or type of crime. In other words, it is targeting specific ethnic groups because they are more likely to commit certain crimes. Racial p rofiling is a flagrant form ofRead MorePolice Brutality Of African Americans1405 Words   |  6 Pagesyears police brutality towards African Americans has increased. This violence has resulted in riots across the United States. The August 2014 death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri many Americans, some who are former Civil Rights activists, have spoken out against police brutality. Black Lives Matter states that the movement’s goal is to bring justice to the present unjust police killings of African Americans. Looking at prior cases of brutality and its connection to racial profiling, suchRead MoreRacial Profiling in Canada1166 Words   |  5 PagesRacial profiling is the act of selecting targets for criminal investigation not on behavioural merit, but exclusively on markers of personal identity such as race, ethnicity, and religious orientation (Perry, 2011, p.9). In other words, racial profiling is the by-product of subjecting individuals who are from a particular racial community to a higher degree of scrutiny and surveillance by criminal justice system agents when compared to other racial communities (Wortley and Owusu-Bempah, 2011, p.135)

Friday, December 20, 2019

A Short Note On Diabetes Mellitus Type One Essay - 2009 Words

Diabetes Teaching Project Diabetes mellitus type one is also called juvenile onset diabetes, or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. It is most commonly diagnosed in children and teenagers with an abrupt onset. This teaching project will aim at teaching an eleven-year-old girl who is in fifth grade and was recently diagnosed with type one diabetes. Through this teaching project, this patient will be taught about her diagnosis; what is not functioning properly in her body and why that is important; what medications and treatment regimens she will need to follow; how to manage her blood sugar, what kind of foods she can eat and which she should avoid; and how to live a happy healthy life by maintaining her friendships and staying active in sports. The etiology of the disease is found to be an autoimmune disorder. In this process, the body is attacking itself, and killing off beta cells which secrete insulin in the pancreas. Once a majority of the beta cells have been destroyed, there i s an insulin deficiency. Insulin is needed to move glucose from the blood stream into cells and is vital for many body tissues, because it is their energy source. In the absence of insulin, the body breaks down fat and protein to provide energy and resorts to other hormones to make glucose form other sources. This causes an increase in lipolysis, which is the breakdown of triglycerides to glycerol and free fatty acids; increased ketogenesis, which is the formation of ketones from free fattyShow MoreRelatedDiabetes Mellitus : A Disease Affecting Multi Organ System1190 Words   |  5 PagesDiabetes mellitus or DM is a disease affecting multi-organ systems due to the abnormal insulin production, improper insulin usage or even both. It is a very serious health problem throughout the world effecting thousands of people.A survey conducted in United States showed that almost 6.2% of the population suffers from this disease. It is a matter of great issue that almost one -third of the popul ation is unaware of the disease. Incidence Diabetes is actually the fifth leading cause of deathsRead MoreTypes Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus1713 Words   |  7 Pages Introduction: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is a disease that occurs when insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are damaged or are being destroyed (Mahan, Escott-Stump Raymond, 2012). The gradual destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas usually leads to complete insulin deficiency, which ultimately manifests itself in the following symptoms at clinical onset: â€Å"high blood glucose (hyperglycemia), frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), and a significant amount of weightRead MoreType 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Mellitus1711 Words   |  7 Pages Introduction: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is a disease that occurs when insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are damaged or are being destroyed (Mahan, Escott-Stump Raymond, 2012). 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The difference between the two main types of canine diabetes is the body’s inability to respond to insulin, insulin-resistant, or the inability to produce insulin, insulin-deficientRead MoreExploring The Negative Effects Of Maternal Obesity1675 Words   |  7 PagesNusrat Jahan Nicole Garret WRT 102 10/21/2015 Exploring the Negative Effects of Maternal Obesity Obesity in pregnant women is a global concern. In The United States, obesity is a critical public health issue—one in every three women is obese (Masho, et al). This issue becomes crucial in the context that 36% of pregnant women in the United States are obese (Shub, et al). Studies show a strong association between maternal obesity and health risks during pregnancy and labor. In addition, a disconnectRead MoreExercise Test Of Fasting Blood Glucose Levels1360 Words   |  6 Pages After recording their fasting blood glucose levels subjects in the exercise test group transitioned to the gym. At the gym each individual engaged in 45 minutes of moderate exercise. Although no strict controls were put in place to regulate the type or intensity of exercise conducted individuals generally engaged in a reasonably strenuous amount of exercises. Most individuals conducted either cardiovascular exercise such as running and biking or strength training such as calisthenics or weightR ead MorePathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus2103 Words   |  9 PagesPathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases. The body is unable to produce or absorb sufficient amounts of insulin. This causes elevated levels of glucose in the blood. The pancreas normally produces insulin which regulates the level of glucose in the blood as 1)well as how its used. Glucose is vital to your health because its an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. Its also your brains main source ofRead MoreType 1 Diabetes Mellitus ( Iddm ) Essay1599 Words   |  7 PagesType 1 Diabetes Mellitus, also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is destroys pancreatic beta-cells, leading to partial or total loss of insulin production (Merger, et al 170). The exact cause is not known, but the destruction is triggered as an autoimmune response which could be due to the stressors from environment and genetics (Merger, et al 170). â€Å"Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which there is no cure, nor prevention at t he current time† (Merger, et al 170). MostRead MoreInformation: Diabetes Mellitus2985 Words   |  12 PagesDiabetes mellitus, habitually referred to as diabetes is caused by a decline in insulin secretion by the cells of the pancreatic islet resulting into a surge in blood glucose concentration, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Diabetes insipidus is a disorder defined by the secretion of huge quantities of highly diluted urine, this is regardless if a reduction in fluid intake. This is as a result of a deficit of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) also known as vasopressin produced by the posterior pituitaryRead MoreDiabetes Is A Common Disease That Affects A Large Number Of The World s Population Essay1995 Words   |  8 PagesIntroduction Few would argue that diabetes mellitus is not a common disease that affects a large number of the World’s population. Shockingly, the World Health Organization reported that an estimated 347 million people globally have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes (Bossart et al., 2015). In the United States alone that number is 29 million (Wilkins, 2017). What most people do not understand is the distinct connection between diabetes and poor oral health. In fact, periodontal disease is considered